Taking Care of The Carers What Can Universities Do

  • 02-21-2018
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Dual roles are being performed by carers in nearly every field. Be it work or education, the need for carers is always present. And academia is no different. Let’s try and understand the dynamics of a carer to determine what higher education institutes can do to help staff attempting to juggle dual roles.   Who are carers?   Carers are providers of unpaid care to the old, ill or disabled persons in the family, circle of friends or partners. The work could be a few hours a week or 24/7, depending on the nature of the work. And carers may provide this service within their own home or somewhere else.   Number of Hours of Care Provided   This unpaid work can amount up to 50 hours of work every week, on average, though this number can be as low as 1-19 hours as well. In the UK, according to the Personal Social Services Survey of Adult Carers in the country 2014-15, more than one third of carers put in around 100 hours every week, 13.5% of carers perform services for 19 hours or less a week and 15% of carers care for between 20 and 49 hours, while nearly 14% care for 50 to 100 hours a week. Even though these numbers are useful statistics, the true struggles of the carers cannot be determined without factoring in the impact of working full-time along with caring. This dual role is assumed by nearly every other carer out there. A dual role could be in many senses – it could be combining caring with looking after young kids, driving long distances to provide the required care, looking after old parents, looking after sick family members or friends, taking care of LGBTQ members and so on. Such hectic dual work can have a serious impact on your life.   What kind of care do carers provide?   The vast majority of care is usually provided by a family member or a friend and can be highly demanding and complex in nature. But more often than not, carers are simply required to help carry out routine tasks for those under care. For instance, they proved practical help and in matters such as preparing meals, shopping or taking care of laundry. It could also involve keeping an eye on the person you are caring for, keeping them company, taking them out, taking care of their financial records, helping them deal with care services and understand benefits available to them and helping them with various other aspects of personal care.   Who do carers care for?    Carers can be responsible for looking after a variety of different people, such as: Parents Parents-in-law Spouse or partner Disabled children (less than 18 years) Adult children (18+ years) Grandparents Relatives Friends Neighbors Common problems being looked after by carers include: Physical disabilities Sensory impairment Mental health problems Dementia   Problems faced by Carers   Due to the overall lifestyle of carers, they usually face a lot of problems. Have a look at the following: Financial Problems: Caring for a loved one, especially one with a chronic disease can take a huge financial toll on the carer. Assistive equipment, heating and laundry bills, added transport costs etc can amount up to huge figures. Health: Carers work round the clock to earn and then provide care. This tends to take a toll on their physical and mental health. Caring may lead to additional stress, insomnia, lack of rest and associated problems. Social exclusion and personal relationships: In order to care for a loved one, carers end up losing out a lot in terms of social activities and personal relationships. They often become isolated due to their large number of responsibilities.   What can universities do to support the carers in their staff?   Educational institutions play an important role in bringing out the change required in this regard. They understand the needs of their staff and are in a position to provide the right kind of assistance to them. The first matter of concern is dissecting the issue at both the sector and national levels. Institutions should not be the only ones bearing this responsibility. That being said, universities need to make a genuine effort to gather extensive data on carers and their concerns – as of now, the data available is vague and patchy. Following this, raising awareness among staff, specifically those in the line management and policy making, would help further the cause. This awareness might actually make it easier for carers to share whatever concerns they have, especially in a setting where carers feel a lack of support. To create a carer-friendly culture, universities would be required to acknowledge and address the needs of carers through specific support systems, such as carer leave and child care. However, that is not enough. Most of the disparity arises from the fact that the same principles and policies are applied to employees who are carers and employees who are not carers. An inclusive environment needs to be created by making care a mainstream element in policy making. Changes at a very small scale can go a long way in supporting carers. In addition to that, universities should also make an attempt to honor carers – the support and recognition can have a very motivating effect.   Read More

Online Education The Right Choice For Veterans

  • 02-21-2018
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  From battlefields to settling down in suburbs, the life of a veteran could be full of challenges. Picking up from where they had left off is easier said than done. Setting priorities while transitioning to civilian life is one of the biggest challenges. For many, however, returning from Iraq, Afghanistan, South Korea and other hot zones, pursuing education has been a top priority. Thankfully the resources are available. The federal government offers several programs to the veterans, should they choose to pursue higher education. The Post 9/11 GI Bill is designed for the purpose of giving several advantages to veterans who intend to attend college. In the 12 years between 2000 and 2012, more than 900,000 veterans and members of the military received education benefits through the US Department of Veterans Affairs. The largest number of veterans enrolled was between 2009 and 2010, since the Post 9/11 GI bill, passed in 2008, took effect in 2009.   What does the GI Bill offer?   The updated GI Bill, pays the in-state tuition and fees. It also covers the dependent spouses or children of the veterans, along with the provision of a monthly stipend for school related and other expenses, such as buying books, other supplies and residence expense. This law was enacted to encourage veterans to opt for higher education and expand their horizons.     But It’s Still Not Easy   But even with this level of ease for the veterans to enroll in college, there are several issues that arise, especially in case of traditional educational institutes. The rules and regulations imposed by traditional colleges in terms of class schedules, credit transfers, credit hours, course structures, attendance criteria and so on are difficult for many veterans to adhere to. In addition to that, these veterans might experience a certain lack of camaraderie and understanding from the fellow students around them. The faculty might be difficult to deal with as well, especially when it come to obtaining credits for military training and experience. This lead to the question – is online education the right answer for veterans?   Benefits of Online Education for Veterans   Flexible Schedules: The US Military hires many part-time officials that are called to duty at random times. These officials regularly bounce back and forth between their homes and military bases making the on-campus education option hard to manage. With online education, however, this problem is solved. They can take classes from wherever they are and at whatever time of the day. If they are gone for a few weeks, they can cover up for it when they come back, because of the flexibility offered by most online education programs. In addition to that, it is much easier to pause an online program as compared to freezing a semester in a traditional college.   Transition: For veterans coming in from active duty, transitioning to normal life is a major concern. A traditional college experience is, more often than not, too much to handle. Beck Hannaford, Ball State’s Veterans Benefits and Financial Assistant Coordinator, talks about this phenomenon, "A lot of veterans are very uncomfortable when they return to a traditional campus," he says. "They'll come in and say to me, 'What are these stupid questions the 18-year-olds ask me?' It's a problem." Fitting into college life is hard for these military men, since they have come from a very different and traumatizing environment. Going for the online option can help ease this transition process and make it simpler for them to cope with a new lifestyle.   Understanding the System: Most traditional colleges have very rigid systems, in terms of admission process, credit hours, class timings, etc. Every function has its own set of principles that can be very difficult to grasp without a lot of guidance. Since the military personnel are used to a highly structured system, an entirely different structure is quite difficult to adopt. And in case the university does not offer a lot of guidance, these veterans might end up feeling lost for most of the time, leading to frustration and dissatisfaction.    Psychological Concerns: Due to the traumatizing conditions experienced in the line of duty, most military personnel are psychologically affected, in one way or the other. This is made worse by the physical or invisible wounds that some veterans may be dealing with. In most cases, soldiers returning from hot zones have multiple psychological and physical injuries. Hannaford talks about this, "Many veterans are coming back with transition issues, whether it comes from traumatic brain injury or PTSD. Those cause problems in the classroom and make you feel uncomfortable." This discomfort makes traditional education an unappealing option for most veterans. Hannaford talks about having worked with veterans who have post-traumatic stress disorder. According to him, they face a multitude of challenges in a classroom setting. Some recall explosions or are triggered by minor physical interactions, while others refuse to sit in rooms that have no windows. Hannaford says that one of his students even ran out of class when tornado sirens were being tested, saying that these reminded him of missiles. On the other hand, online education offers these veterans a more peaceful environment.   Top Online Programs for Veterans The following are some of the best online programs available to veterans in the US. Name of the Institution Location Cost per Credit Enrollment School Type Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University - Worldwide Daytona Beach, Florida $365 14,470 Private University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma $630 1,302 Public Arizona State University Tempe, AZ $500 23,672 Public Western Kentucky University Bowling Green, KY $496 3,130 Public California University of Pennsylvania California, PA $308 2,422 Public West Texas A&M University Canyon, TX $295 1,234 Public Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA $542 5,608 Public Utah State University Logan, UT $310 1,653 Public   There are many other universities in the US that offer tremendous opportunities for veterans. These include the likes of Colorado State University – Global Campus, Daytona State College, Fort Hays State University, Washington State University, University of Florida, Charleston Southern University, CUNY School of Professional Studies and many others. With so many options available, online education is truly an ideal path for veterans looking to advance their education and pick up their life from where they left it.    Read More

Is Lsat The Answer

  • 02-21-2018
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  For nearly 70 years, the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) has been the way to enter the realm of legal education. But that might be changing. The test that is designed to gauge students’ ability to “survive” the first year of law school, may be on its way out. The rule that allows law schools to relax their policy on LSAT was announced in 2014, by the American Bar Association (ABA) – the body that governs most of the law schools in the country. The rule states that up to 10% of the students being admitted in a particular year in the law class can be taken in without having given the LSAT. Interpretation 503-3 of the Standard 503 on Admission Tests, under the ABA Standards and Rules of Procedure for Approval of Law Schools 2016-2017, states the following in this regard: It is not a violation of this Standard for a law school to admit no more than 10% of an entering class without requiring the LSAT from: Students in an undergraduate program of the same institution as the J.D. program; and/or Students seeking the J.D. degree in combination with a degree in a different discipline.   Applicants admitted under subsection (a) must meet the following conditions: Scored at or above the 85th percentile on the ACT or SAT for purposes of subsection (a)(1), or for purposes of subsection (a)(2), scored at or above the 85th percentile on the GRE or GMAT; and Ranked in the top 10% of their undergraduate class through six semesters of academic work, or achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or above through six semesters of academic work. With this rule now in place, an increasing number of law schools are beginning to question the efficacy of LSAT altogether.   Law Students without LSAT – Better or Worse? With such a major change being brought about in the admissions process, many have begun to ask questions about its suitability and applicability in legal education. This change might enable law schools to attract more applicants, who otherwise might not consider going into the legal field. However, it will not make law schools any easier. Applicants would now have to prove their abilities via other means, such as transcripts, letters of recommendation, personal essays and so on. The admission process without the LSAT would give a certain amount of authority to individual universities on how they want to admit their students – the way how different universities utilize this authority will determine whether the application of this rule would be for the better or for worse in the long run.  Which Law School No Longer Require the LSAT? The biggest question for prospective law students is which law schools do not have the LSAT requirement anymore. They’d be surprised to find some really big names on this list. Have a look: Law Schools that don’t require the LSAT Harvard Law School University of Arizona College of Law Northwestern Pritzker School of Law Georgetown Law Center Massachusetts School of Law   Instead of the LSAT, law schools are moving towards another standardized test – the GRE. Harvard Law School announced its plans to nix the LSAT in favor of the GRE in March 2017. Many started to wonder whether this would result in other major law schools abandoning the LSAT as well. This question was answered soon. On 8th August, 2017, two more schools, Georgetown and Northwestern announced that they too would now accept the GRE for law school admissions. This begs the question… Can GRE replace the LSAT? The LSAT is designed to test the analytical abilities of prospective lawyers. It tests students in the areas of reading comprehension, logical reasoning, writing and analytical reasoning. None of these are specific to legal education or law in particular. On the other hand, the GRE also tests student knowledge in a wide variety of fields such as communication and reasoning – skills which are integral for law school applicants. The GRE also covers the subject of math, which is not tested in the LSAT – which proponents of GRE believe is not fair, arguing that math is important in all professions. GRE would also serve as a way to attract students who want to consider law school, but do not want to go through the whole LSAT test prep process. In addition to that, the GRE is easier to take in terms of time and place.   However… Kellye Y. Testy, the CEO and president of LSAC, the authority in charge of the LSAT has shown concern over law schools jumping on the GRE bandwagon. She said that the current system is put into place to assure quality control and the high worth of law graduates. She advised law schools to move ahead with caution, “We believe in innovation and experimentation and certainly anything that would open access and improve legal education and the profession. But we are concerned with how quickly schools are jumping to the GRE without any reliable studies of what it means." She went on to add that the studies that LSAT abandoning law schools have cited are "small," and "we would like them to take a little more time to study what this means.” Whether the GRE completely replaces the LSAT or modifications are added to the LSAT to make it more current and relevant, the wheels for a potentially greater change have been set into motion. The results of this change will be evident in the next few years as students enter law schools with new admission requirements and attempt to prove their worth through merit.     Read More

From Graduation to Owning A Home

  • 02-21-2018
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From Graduation to Owning a Home – Where you should Settle after College  The American Dream isn’t complete without a home you can call your own. However, the reality of living the American Dream starts way before you sign on the mortgage papers. For instance, the salary potential of your degree plays a critical role in deciding what kind of lifestyle you can afford. And the real estate market decides which city you will eventually call home.   Here is a breakdown in numbers of five cities in the US (in no particular order) where your degree can make you a homeowner. San Francisco, California – City by the Bay   The progressive and inclusive culture of San Francisco will have you in love with this city in no time. Being the birthplace of gay rights and the counterculture movement, the city welcomes all kinds of people from different parts of the world. On top of that, it is a neighbor to the famous Silicon Valley, which would be ideal if you have a career in technology. The city also offers a great outdoor lifestyle, tremendous amounts of natural beauty and the perfect, mild weather. San Francisco offers great food as well with tons of good restaurants to try. The city is a gastronomic hub for the adventurous. The arts and culture along with professional sports make San Francisco a place anyone would want to call home. San Francisco ranks at 31 out of 189 on Time’s list of Happiest and Healthiest Cities in America. Even though the real estate here is a bit pricey, the city continues to attract new residents all year round. Median Home Price Monthly Mortgage Payment Salary Needed Professions Duration of the degree $835,400 $3,550 $152,000 Anesthesiologists ($208,000) Master’s Degree (2 years) Nurse Anesthetists ($205,710) Master’s Degree (2 years) Chief Executives ($208,000+) Master’s Degree (2 years)   Los Angeles, California – La La Land   Los Angeles is full of diverse cultures and people of all ethnicities. It has a 47.9% Hispanic/Latino population with 27.5% Caucasians, along with a small percentage of Asians, Africa-Americans and American Indians. The overall culture of the city is pretty laid back and people here are very relaxed, unlike in high-powered cities like New York. On top of that, the population here is health-conscious and yoga is considered almost a way of life. The food scene in Los Angeles is pretty great as well, as there is a rich diversity of cuisines – Thai, Korean, Asian, Italian, Persian, Chinese, Armenian and so on. Whether you want sushi, burgers or pizza, Los Angeles offers the best of everything. With a Mediterranean climate, Los Angeles offers a break from the harsh winters of Maine, Vermont and New York.   You don’t need to be a movie star to live in Los Angeles, other professions do well here too. Los Angeles ranks at 53 out of 189 on Time’s list of Happiest and Healthiest Cities in America. Median Home Price Monthly Mortgage Payment Salary Needed to Buy Professions Duration of the degree $536,700 $2,336 $100,000 Marketing Managers ($142,290) Software Master’s Degree (2 years) Computer Network Architects ($119,830) Bachelor’s Degree (4 years) Developers, Applications ($107,240) Bachelor’s Degree (4 years)   Miami, Florida – Gateway to the Americas   One of the best things about Miami is the affordable real estate. If you can spare around $1,500 per month, you can afford a condo with 15ft high ceilings, right across the AmericanAirlines Arena. The taxation is a lot better here as well, as there is no tax on income, inheritance and estate – so you end up taking more home. The city is also open to diversity and new cultures and has great weather all year round. The health care services here are top-notch – the city ranks at number 35 out of 189 on the Time’s list of Happiest and Healthiest Cities in America. What makes Miami even more attractive are the beaches - Miami Beach, South Beach and Virginia Key Beach. But that isn’t the only form of entertainment available here – the entertainment scene in the city is quite happening with countless events all year round. Median Home Price Monthly Mortgage Payment Salary Needed to Buy Professions Duration of the degree $315,000 $1,513 $65,000 Biomedical Engineers ($76,480) Bachelor’s Degree (4 years) Budget Analysts ($68,260) Bachelor’s Degree (4 years) Physical Therapist ($74,660) Doctoral Degree (4-5 years)   Dallas, Texas – D Town   Dallas attracts almost 300 new residents every day and for a good reason. The city offers the right employment opportunities and has created more than 400,000+ jobs since 2008 recession. The affordable home prices add one of the reasons young professionals are moving to Dallas. The Dallas Cowboys and a downtown area packed with exciting things to see and do, offers an added incentive of moving to this city. With an average monthly mortgage of $1,255, you can certainly make the most of your earnings here. Add to that, the vibrant energy of the city, Dallas is also classified as the largest urban district in the US. Home to the wonderful Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas is ranked at 55 out of 189 on Time’s list of Happiest and Healthiest Cities in America. Median Home Price Monthly Mortgage Payment Salary Needed to Buy Professions Duration of the degree $230,500 $1,255 $54,000 Network and Computer Systems Administrators ($88,790) Bachelor’s Degree (4 years) Food Scientist and Technologists ($85,990) Bachelor’s Degree (4 years) Fundraisers ($55,930) Bachelor’s Degree (4 years)   San Antonio, Texas – Countdown City   San Antonio has one of the strongest job markets in the US, and is home to five Fortune 500 companies. The city also offers affordable housing. Diversity in the local cuisine and a buzzing nightlife are a few reasons why people flock to this city. Sports fanatics would fit right in and would love supporting the Spurs – the team that has won five NBA Championships since 1999. Even if you’re not a basketball fan, there are plenty of other teams here to support. The city’s music scene is perfect for audiophiles. San Antonio also has two spectacular art museums and on the first Friday of every month, art lovers gather to enjoy festivals that feature beautiful art pieces, delicious food and lots of talented individuals. The city ranks at number 24 out of 189 on Time’s list of Happiest and Healthiest Cities in America. Median Home Price Monthly Mortgage Payment Salary Needed to Buy Professions Duration of the degree $212,300 $1,127 $48,500 Energy Auditors ($71,590) Post-Secondary Certificate (6 months – 1 year) Non-Destructive Testing Specialists ($62,730) High School Diploma or Equivalent            (4 years) Instructional Designers and Technologists ($67,730) Master’s Degree (2 years)   Cities all across the US are full of wonderful opportunities and amazing lifestyles. The journey from graduation to home ownership is one you need to map out and execute very carefully. This kind of basic level planning about your future can help you live a quality life in the long run. *Salaries for all professions are city-specific annual figures taken from O*Net Online. *The median home price and mortgage payment figures are courtesy of Business Insider. *The happiness index is taken from Time Magazine’s list of Healthiest and Happiest Cities in the US         Read More

10 Things Veterans Should Look For While Selecting A College

  • 02-21-2018
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Take a look at the following statistics from Washington Post/Kaiser Family Foundation Poll as they will help put things into perspective: 55% of those who served in the military feel disconnected from civilian life 56% miss something from their time at war – typically their fellow soldiers or the companionship 25% feel guilty about some of the things they did during war time Returning to civilian life has been one of the biggest challenges for veterans. While most veterans feel the excitement of going back home to their loved ones, the transition period can nevertheless be really tough on them. Their biggest concern – how to transition from a rigid military lifestyle to civilian life. Many try to settle down in their “new” life by enrolling in a college or university, hoping to gain college-level credentials, essential in seeking a good job. However, it has not always been easy for some veterans to enroll in a college as they face the following questions and concerns: Will I fit in? Is going back to college the answer? How do I search for the right college? Will my traumatizing experiences in war make it difficult for me to get a normal college experience? Are there any online schools for military I can look into? Are there institutions in place to help me adjust back into civilian life? With concerns like these, thinking about going to college can be distressing. However, if you have the right checklist of what veterans should look for in a college, the process will be far less daunting. Here is a list of 10 things that you ought to look for when considering a college:   Welcoming Spirit and Respect: Look for a military-friendly college that understands settling down in civilian life is not always easy – a college that respect this fact and do everything in their power to make transition easier for veterans. Make sure the college understands veterans’ interests both on and off campus. Picture yourself as part of the college community and see if it feels comfortable and sufficiently supported.   Cost: Cost of a degree is a concern for any college applicant. Consider colleges that fall well within your budget. However, in case of veterans, some special benefits or scholarships might be available. This could be offered by the state or by the university itself. Ask for details regarding financial benefits relating to veterans at the university admissions office.     Yellow Ribbon and other Benefits: The Post-9/11 G.I. Bill is applicable to all schools. But some colleges go further and voluntarily take part in the Yellow Ribbon Program with the Veterans Administration. This means that these colleges are willing to provide funds for veterans in addition to those made available to them through the G.I. Bill. Schools like these, which go beyond the basics, are the ones to look for.   Staff that Knows Veterans’ Affairs: Navigating and understanding the postsecondary benefits available to veterans can be tricky. The G.I. Bill, for instance, is a formal legal document which enlists the benefits available to veterans, including tuition for education, living expenses or loans to start a business, etc. So, when selecting a college, make sure that the staff in charge of admissions has sufficient knowledge of these benefits for veterans and are in a position to advice accordingly.     Ability to Use Military Experience in Return for Credit: Many veterans who have taken classes and grasped critical skills during their active military service, might be able to get this experience counted towards college credits. Look for college programs that make their policies on this matter clear. If the policies are not clear, ask about them.   Flexibility: One of the toughest parts about going back into a traditional college setup is the flexibility element. Most veterans have jobs and families to take care of and therefore prefer a relaxed academic schedule and calendar. Colleges that offer more time to complete regular degrees or allow switching from day classes to night/weekend classes should be preferred. Similarly, the best online colleges for military are those that offer the option of taking classes at times that are convenient for the students with a pace that suits them the best. This way, veterans would not have to worry about managing their jobs along with their continuing education.     A Devoted Career Center: The main reason behind going back to college is to land a good job. The job market out there is tough, especially for veterans, who may have come back with a lot of emotional baggage. Therefore, look for colleges that have strong career advisory teams, which make genuine efforts to get the perfect placements for veterans. Ask yourself these questions: Do they hold regular career development sessions and have multiple opportunities available to them via different channels? Do they review resumes and hold networking events? Do they have special training sessions to prepare veterans to adjust to the job market? Answers to these questions will help you determine the quality of a college’s career services.   Support Services: Due to the trauma of experiencing war firsthand, some veterans suffer from physical or mental illnesses. Have a look at these statistics: 43% state that their physical health is worse since their return from war 31% say that their emotional and mental health has worsened since returning from war
(Source: Washington Post/Kaiser Family Foundation Poll) With numbers like these, it is very important for veterans to consider the presence of support services in a college. Potential services to look out for include mental and physical care personnel, priority enrollment and housing for veterans, etc. These services can go on to have a big impact on how easily veterans adjust to their new life and how involved they feel in the community around them. Student Clubs and Activities for Veterans: Most schools have clubs dedicated to veterans. If the school you are looking into does not have one, you should be concerned. These societies and clubs play an integral part in helping veterans integrate into the community and familiarize themselves with others like them, while participating in traditional campus activities such as sports, elections, music events, etc.   Future Plans: Just like with other college applicants, veterans also select a school that suits their future plans. Therefore, having a clear future plan before enrolling into a school is critically important for the veterans as well. Lay out a future plan for yourself and look for colleges that offer educational paths that coincide with your plan. This could be a business plan you intend on working on, or a particular kind of career you want to go into. Settling down in civilian life and going back to college doesn’t have to be daunting. While the above mentioned 10-point checklist may not alleviate your war-related stress, it will certainly help you zero in on the best college for you.     Read More

Things Successful People Never Do Again

  • 02-21-2018
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Here are ten examples of successful people who stumbled, but didn’t let it get in the way of their future. 1) - Don’t be Afraid to Ask – From Manchester to London Before she became the first billionaire author, JK Rowling was a down on her luck unemployed single mother living on state benefits. On a delayed train ride from Manchester, where she lived, to London, a fully formed idea of a dark haired boy in round spectacles fell into her head. Too shy to ask someone for a pen, JK Rowling sat back and spent the four hour ride thinking about ideas for the book. Even though she did eventually get a pen and wrote her ideas down on a napkin, the lesson here is to not be shy and ask for help whenever you need it. 2) – Don’t let ego get in your way – The $200 Billion Mistake Berkshire Hathaway may be the financial powerhouse today and Warren Buffet the elder statesmen of investment, however this wasn’t always the case. In 1965, Berkshire Hathaway was a textile mill caught in a death spiral. After feeling slight on an offer price difference - the difference being 1/8 of a point lower than what was agreed - Buffet immediately bought the controlling stake in the company. Thankfully for Buffet, Berkshire Hathaway turned out to be a monumental success with 18.3% annual returns over 30 years. However the investment sage later called it a $200 billion mistake and vowed never to make a business decision on emotions. 3) – Not All Pranks Are Funny – Thanks You Sir Richard Branson Billionaire founder of the Virgin Group, Richard Branson is known for his pranks and unconventional ways. In 1986 for an interview for Music Week, Branson joked that he had invented a ‘Music Box’ that would allow users to store songs on a tiny device. Sound familiar? Fifteen years later, Apple introduced the IPod to the world. The ball dropped when Steve Jobs personally confessed to Branson that the idea for the IPod came from his 1986 Music Week interview. Richard Branson calls it a huge mistake and it was, as in the end it was the ITunes that drove Virgin Megastores out of business. 4) – Present your Case – Believe in your G Drive Twenty two year old Justin Rosenstein first came up with the idea of having a drive where users with different operating systems could sync and share files with each other. Working at Google at the time, Rosenstein presented his idea to the Google Docs team and Larry Page who turned it down. Without giving G Drive another shot, Rosenstein went to Facebook and from there he co founded Asana in 2008. Five years later, Google launched the unfinished project of Rosenstein and called it the Google Drive. Rosenstein says of the experience, you must have the confidence to present your case with conviction. For others to believe in your idea, first you must believe in it yourself. 5) – Perseverance of Colonel Sanders – The Secret Recipe for Success The twelve publishers who rejected Harry Potter or Decca Record’s Dick Rowe who passed on the Beatles, the story of Colonel Sanders and KFC follows a similar theme. After retiring and contemplating suicide at 65, Colonel Sanders decided to avoid the mistake of giving up and giving in to despair. He developed his unique recipe and started selling it door to door. Walt Disney may have been rejected 302 times, but this number doesn’t hold water against Colonel Sander’s 1009 rejections. He took all the rejections in his stride and persevered. By the time he turned 88, Colonel Sanders was a billionaire founder of the KFC Empire. 6) – Listen to your Audience – From Customer to Competitor When a young tractor manufacturer, in the early 60s gave technical notes to Enzo Ferrari on how to improve his top of the line luxury sports car, Ferrari didn’t take it well and told the tractor mechanic to stick to what he knows best. Not the one to take an insult, the young tractor manufacturer decided to design a luxury sports car better than Ferrari. Four months later in October 1963, the young tractor manufacturer introduced a luxury sports car at the Turin Motor Show. The name of the young tractor manufacturer was Ferruccio Lamborghini and the car he introduced was Lamborghini 350 GTV. Hence, a rivalry was born of an insult. 7) – Steve Ballmer’s I Phone Dilemma – Price over Value is No Laughing Matter   Former CEO of Microsoft and the current owner of the Los Angeles Clippers is known for his business wisdom. Under his leadership, Microsoft’s annual revenue jumped from $25 billion to $70 billion and the net income increased 215%. It was also under Ballmer’s leadership Microsoft presented the smart phone market to Apple on a silver platter. In an interview in 2007, Ballmer is seen laughing at the I Phone saying the device is too expensive and doesn’t have a keyboard which makes it ‘not a very good e mail machine’. Little did he know that his ridicule of the most revolutionary product in recent history would make him look like an out of touch technology executive. 8) – Star Wars & Indiana Jones – Opportunity only Knocks Twice Harrison Ford is the highest grossing actor of all time. With global sales in billions of dollars ($4,872bn to be exact), Harrison Ford can thank the Star Wars and the Indiana Jones franchises for his status. However, Ford wasn’t the first choice for either of these mega franchises. The iconic role of Hans Solo was first offered to Al Pacino who rejected it. And Spielberg’s and Lucas’s first choice for Indiana Jones was Tom Selleck who couldn’t get out of his Magnum PI’s contract to commit to the project. In both cases Harrison Ford stepped in. Even though both Pacino and Selleck did well in their respective careers, it still would be nice to have these movies on one’s resume.  9) - Curse of the Bambino – Superstition or a Bad Business Decision What if your team has one of the biggest cultural sports icons and you suddenly trade him to your rivals in the off season. This is what the Red Sox owner Harry Frazee did after the 1919 season. With Babe Ruth, the Red Sox had an impeccable record with three World Series wins in his five year tenure. However, as soon as Babe Ruth was traded, Red Sox stopped winning World Series titles. On the other hand, Babe Ruth made an immediate impact with the New York Yankees and helped them win four World Series titles. It took the Red Sox 86 years to shake off the curse. Many say it is superstition, however if given another chance, the Red Sox would think twice about the trade. 10) – Introducing the New Coke – The Other Guy Just Blinked     Its 1985 and Coke is at the top with Pepsi gaining ground in market share. To diversify, Coke decides to change their century old formulae. The new Coke tastes smoother and sweeter and the pollsters and market researchers love it. However, there is one problem. The Coke drinkers don’t. It’s always a bad idea for any business to tinker with something consumers like. As soon as the new Coke went out into the market, Coke drinkers from all over the US organized grass root protests to force the original formulae back. This is when Pepsi Co CEO Roger Enrico summarized the debacle these two products, Pepsi and Coke have been going at it eyeball to eyeball, and in my view the other guy just blinked.  Enrico couldn’t have put it perfectly. In the end, The Coca Cola Company was forced to bring back the old formulae and their CEO apologized for causing the biggest marketing disaster in recent years. The smart learn from their mistakes while the wise learn from others mistakes. Whether its business or any other aspect of life, mistakes are markers that help the successful climb the learning curve. For in the end, it is what individuals learn from their mistakes that makes the difference.   Read More

Top 30 Business Management Programs

  • 07-24-2017
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The programs in the following list have been ranked using a multitude of factors, including cost, reputability, accreditation, expected average salary after graduation and return on investment. These selected top business management programs focus on exposing students to the depths of leadership qualities and various aspects of management. 25. Manhattanville College - School of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $35,685 Accrediting Agency: Middle States Commission of Higher Education; IACBE Student Enrollment: 2,921 This college is accredited through the Middle States Commission of Higher Education, and also ranks on the Princeton Review’s list for the Best Northeastern Colleges. The School of Business itself is quite well-known for its result-focused approach to teaching. It is accredited through the IACBE. The tuition cost for this business program is also considered to be considerably lower at $35,685, compared to other colleges of its caliber. The curriculum is well-rounded, combining various core courses with specific electives to ensure that the students enrolled get a comprehensive understanding of management, business tactics and leadership methods. A few courses that you might get to study in this program include Global Business, Operations Management, Business Leadership and Entrepreneurship. 24. Texas A&M University – Commerce College of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $11,508 Accrediting Agency: AACSB International; Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Student Enrollment: 12,928 The programs in this university are accredited by the AACSB International while the University holds an accreditation through the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. In terms of tuition cost, TAMUC offers one of the most competitive packages with just $11,508. The potential for high return on investment is great. To apply to this school, applicants must have an undergraduate CGPA of at least 3.0, along with official GMAT/GRE transcripts. Admission requirements and forms are available on the university’s official website. 23. The New School – Milano School of International Affairs, Management & Urban Policy – New York Estimated Tuition Fee: $66,780 Accrediting Agency: Middle States Commission of Higher Education Student Enrollment: 10,254 This New York based business school is truly a class apart. It is accredited by the Middle States Commission of Higher Education. The tuition cost is $66,780, which is affordable in terms of return on investment and average salaries for business graduates in and around New York. The 42 credit hour program for the Master of Science in Organization Change Management at The New School exposes students to a variety of different courses. These include Management and Organizational Behavior, Foundations of Organizational Chance and Organizational Assessment and Diagnosis. In addition to core courses, students are also required to take 12 credit hours of elective courses to complete the degree.   22. Wake Forest University – School of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $45,678 Accrediting Agency: Southern Association of Colleges and School; AACSB International; Commission on Colleges Student Enrollment: 7,500 The Master of Arts in Management degree offered by the Wake Forest University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, AACSB International and the Commission on Colleges. The estimated tuition fee of the degree is considered highly affordable and a genuinely solid investment at $45,678. The courses offered under this prestigious program include Financial Management, Business Analytics, Operations Management, Business Strategy and Planning and Business Modeling. For application into this program, students must have completed a bachelor’s degree or should be close to completing it, in a field related to Liberal Arts, Engineering or Sciences. 21. Saint Joseph’s University College of Arts & Sciences Estimated Tuition Fee: $30,708 Accrediting Agency: Middle States Commission on Higher Education Student Enrollment: 6,500 This Philadelphia based university has a well-reputed Masters of Science program in Organizational Development and Leadership that is offered through its prestigious College of Arts and Sciences. This program is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. The estimated tuition fee of the Organizational Development Program is at affordable $30,708. This highly focused degree is designed to mainly deal with professionals who are looking for relevant learning in various aspects of organizational and leadership capabilities. Students in this program will be taught about general leadership skills, how to cope with major organizational changes, organizational psychology, personal development and adult education and training. 20. Azusa Pacific University – School of Behavioral and Applied Sciences Estimated Tuition Fee: $24,660 Accrediting Agency: Western Association of Schools and Colleges; IACBE Student Enrollment: 9,975 This California based school is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges as well as the IACBE. The tuition fee at Azusa Pacific is at a highly affordable figure of $24,660, making this program one of the best options in terms of high return on investment. The Master of Arts in Leadership program is a faith based degree offered through the prestigious School of Behavioral and Applied Sciences at the University. It is a 36-credit hour program and can be completed online, as well as by taking classes during evenings and weekends. Its online option makes this degree a highly convenient option for working professionals. 19. University of San Diego – School of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $59,940 Accrediting Agency: Western Association of Schools and Colleges; Senior College and University Commission; AACSB Global Student Enrollment: 8,251 The Master of Science in Executive Leadership program offered at the University of San Diego holds the prestigious accreditation through the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, Senior College and University Commission and also through the AACSB Global. The estimated tuition fee for the program that lasts a total of 36 credit hours is $59,940, which is good as far as return on investment is concerned. This particular program is made specifically according to the needs of professionals who are already working in the field and are looking for a convenient way to advance their skills and education. Classes are offered in a convenient format and at flexible timings. 18. Pepperdine University – Graziadio School of Business and Management Estimated Tuition Fee: $56,304 Accrediting Agency: Western Association of Schools and Colleges; Senior College and University Commission; AACSB Student Enrollment: 7,632 The Master of Science in Management and Leadership program offered at the Pepperdine University is a convenient option for professionals who work full-time. The entire program can be completed in merely 16 months, in a part-time format. The estimated tuition cost for this program adds up to approximately $56,304. The Management and Leadership Program is designed to give students detailed knowledge and the necessary tools to become well-rounded business leaders. To enter into this program, students will be required to complete an online form, followed by the submission of an essay, official transcripts and resume. 17. University of Miami – School of Business Administration Estimated Tuition Fee: $57,000 Accrediting Agency: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools; Commission on Colleges, AACSB International Student Enrollment: 16,825 Students enrolled in this school can earn a highly sought-after Master of Science degree in Management Studies with a Specialization in Leadership. The estimated tuition fee for this program is around $57,000. This program is specifically designed for people who hold management or leadership positions and want to work towards the advanced development in a variety of areas. However, this program is not a replacement for a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree. Students will be exposed to courses such as Business Analytics and Operational Excellence, Business Planning Fundamentals and Communications and Leadership across Cultures. 16. Pace University – Lubin School of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $37,045 Accrediting Agency: Middle States Commission on Higher Education; AACSB International Student Enrollment: 12,843 This New York based university offers a Master of Science in Strategic Management. The program is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education and the AACSB International. The program can be completed in 31 credit hours and costs an estimated amount of $37,045. The courses included in this program are Competitive Business Strategy, Venture Initiation and Entrepreneurship, Government Institutions and Business Strategy and Global Corporate Governance. To get admission into this program, students must first apply online and complete the given form, followed by the submission of two letters of recommendation, a personal statement, official college transcripts and a resume. 15. George Mason University – School of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $33,606 Accrediting Agency: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools; AACSB International Student Enrollment: 33,000 The Master of Science in Management is offered at the George Mason University through their School of Business. The University is accredited through the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools while the School of Business has an accreditation through AACSB International. The tuition fee for the college is at a competitive $33,606, offering a great return on investment. The core courses in this program include the likes of Statistical Analysis for Management, Managing Business Operations in a Global Environment and Fundamentals of Behaviors in Organizations. To apply, students must complete an application and submit their official transcripts, current resume and official GMAT or GRE score, along with a personal statement and at least one letter of recommendation. 14. Case Western Reserve University – Weatherhead School of Management Estimated Tuition Fee: $48,939 Accrediting Agency: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools; AACSB International Student Enrollment: 10,700 This Ohio based university offers a highly specialized Master of Science in Management program through its Weatherhead School of Management. This school is accredited through the AACSB International, which is the top accrediting agency for higher education specifically in the field of business. The University holds an accreditation through the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. This unique program offers several courses related to the business management field, such as Business Analytics, Operations Research and Supply Chain. To get admission into this program, you will need to submit a completed application, along with two essays, official transcripts that include your GPA, current resume, GMAT or GRE score along with proof of proficiency in English language. 13. Rochester Institute of Technology – Saunders College of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $52,260 Accrediting Agency: Middle States Commission on Higher Education; AACSB International Student Enrollment: 16,639 This New York based college offers a prestigious Master of Science in Management program, which is accredited by the AACSB International, and the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. The program costs an estimated amount of $52,260 and offers a really good return on investment. Courses that you can expect to find in this program include Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation, Advanced Topics in Technology Management and Managing for Environmental Sustainability. To get admission into this school, you will have to fill out an online application for the program and submit the documents listed there. 12. Stanford University – Graduate School of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $125,336 Accrediting Agency: Western Association of Schools and Colleges; AACSB International Student Enrollment: 16,000 The Graduate School of Business at Stanford University offers a highly prestigious Master of Science in Management, which is accredited by the AACSB, and the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. This one-year program is a full-time, intensive and accelerated degree that also offers an optional global study component. The total cost for this degree amounts up to $125,336. The return on investment is also quite high, which serves as a justification for this tuition fee. 11. Boston University – Questrom School of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $50,980 Accrediting Agency: New England Association of Schools and Colleges; Commission on Institutions of Higher Education; AACSB International Student Enrollment: 32,000 This Massachusetts based university offers a globally ranked Master of Science program in Management Studies under its Questrom School of Business. The program offers an excellent rate of return on the investment of a tuition fee of $50,980 for the nine-month long business program. The high return on investment is not only owed to the higher initial salaries, but also to the 100% employment rate that the university boasts of. To apply to this business program, you will need to submit a fully online application available on the university’s website. 10. University of Southern California – Marshall School of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $46,228 Accrediting Agency: Western Association of Schools and Colleges; AACSB International; Senior College and University Commission Student Enrollment: 43,401 This Los Angeles based university offers a Master of Management Studies degree through its Marshall School of Business. USC has more than 375,000 alumni that include some famous names such as George Lucas, Marcus Allen, Forest Whitaker and Will Ferrell. Students enrolled in this program would have the option of a full-time program or part-time classes, as is suited to their individual needs. To get admission into the program, applicants must have a bachelor’s degree, one year of MBA education, GPA of 3.3, at least two years of professional work experience and GMAT or GRE score within the 80th percentile. 9. Yale University – School of Management Estimated Tuition Fee: $66,650 Accrediting Agency: AACSB International; New England Association of Schools and Colleges; Commission on Institutions of Higher Education Student Enrollment: 11,000 Yale University has a widely recognized Master of Advanced Management program that is offered via its School of Management. This program can be completed in one-year on a full-time basis and is designed to instill leadership qualities in graduates along with useful managerial skills from a global perspective. The courses focus on the bigger picture and international markets and how trends in cultures can affect organizations. To be eligible for application into this program, students must have an MBA from a Global Network of Advanced Management member school. Along with this, an application form will need to be submitted, along with one professional letter of recommendation. 8. Duke University – Fuqua School of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $49,900 Accrediting Agency: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools; Commission on Colleges; AACSB International The Master of Management: Foundations of Business degree offered at Duke, through its Fuqua School of Business is ideal for students coming in from different business backgrounds. It engages students and allows them to learn by experience and understand the challenges of being in the business world. With the cost of a master’s level program at Duke at an impressive $49,900, the expected return on investment is typically very high. 7. Northwestern University – Kellogg School of Management Estimated Tuition Fee: $53,864 Accrediting Agency: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools; AACSB International Student Enrollment: 21,500 Northwestern University offers a comprehensive Master of Science program in Management Studies that offers a high return on investment. The main campus of the college is in Illinois and it also has additional campuses in Qatar and Doha. This degree can be completed in 10 months and helps prepare students to take leadership roles in their careers. 6. University of Texas at Dallas – Naveen Jindal School of Management Estimated Tuition Fee: $26,448 Accrediting Agency: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools; Commission on Colleges; AACSB International Student Enrollment: 24,554 The Master of Science in Management degree offered by the University of Texas at Dallas, under its prestigious Naveen Jindal School of Management is a 36-month long dynamic management program. It consists of courses from various aspects of business, including science, engineering, mathematics and technology. To apply to this program, you will need to submit your GMAT/GRE score, resume, letters of recommendation, personal statement and official transcripts. 5. University of Florida – Warrington College of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $16,982 Accrediting Agency: AACSB International; Southern Association of Colleges and Schools; Commission on Colleges Student Enrollment: 52,286 Based in Gainesville, Florida, the University of Florida offers a highly sought-after Master of Science in Management program through its business school. This program is designed for students with non-business backgrounds in terms of academics. Part-time and full-time scheduling options are available. Courses covered include the likes of Organizational Behavior, Professional Communication and Global Strategic Management among others. No professional experience is required as a part of the application procedure into this program. 4. Penn State – Smeal College of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $21,294 Accrediting Agency: Middle States Commission on Higher Education; AACSB International Student Enrollment: 50,000 The Master of Professional Studies in Management and Organizational Leadership is among the most sought-after degrees at Penn State. This one-year program is an intensive approach to business management studies with classes taking place Monday through Thursday. Along with classes, the program also includes an immersion experience every semester that focuses on negotiation skills and leadership exercises. 3. Arizona State University – W.P. Carey School of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $24,800 Accrediting Agency: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools; The Higher Learning Commission; AACSB International Student Enrollment: 50,000 The Master in Management Science degree at the ASU is a full-time, on-campus program that lasts a total of nine months. The course structure for this program is designed to give students from different academic backgrounds, a solid understanding of business skills needed to succeed in high level management positions. To apply, prospective students will need to fill out an application, submit their resume, transcripts, letters of recommendation and test scores. 2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology – Sloan School of Management Estimated Tuition Fee: $71,000 Accrediting Agency: New England Association of Schools and Colleges; Commission on Institutes of Higher Education; AACSB International Student Enrollment: 11,000 The Master of Science in Management Science is a nine-month long program that aims to give students a solid foundation of various business concepts. These include decision making skills, real world business challenges, managerial communication, marketing, teamwork, strategy, finance, economics and statistics, among others. With more than 150 years of experience in offering top notch education, MIT is certainly among the most prestigious universities for business management majors. 1. University of Michigan – Stephen M. Ross School of Business Estimated Tuition Fee: $45,223 Accrediting Agency: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, AACSB International and the Higher Learning Commission Student Enrollment: 43,600 The Master of Management degree offered by the University of Michigan business school is a competitive 10-month long program. It gives students from different academic backgrounds a solid understanding of navigating leadership roles and management position in the world of business. To apply to this program, students need to complete an online application and submit GMAT or GRE score, along with official transcripts. An interview might also be conducted to determine the suitability of the applicant for the business program at the university. The Ranking Factors Ranking in this list was done for master’s level programs in business management and related programs, with a focus on leadership. Colleges were then evaluated on the basis of accreditation, with the most prestigious institutions being IACBE, AACSB and ACBSP accredited. Affordability was also a major factor in developing the ranking. Tuition cost for each program was taken into account as well. Average salary and prestige were also important factors taken into consideration. Read More

With The Advent of Digital Technology Higher Education Isnt The Same Anymore

  • 04-26-2017
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Digital technology has certainly brought about many changes in the quality of our lifestyle. And the education sector is no exception to this change. Even though some might call it an overhyped phenomenon, a deeper look into the many layers of education would give a clear picture about the effects of digital technology in this sector. Let’s look at some of these changes in higher education systems that can be attributed to technological advances.

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Online Vs On Campus Nursing Degree Which Is Better

  • 04-21-2017
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For those of you planning a career in nursing, the list of options is vast. There are many ways you can end up in this field, depending on the kind of expertise you intend to develop. You can research into the various higher education options you have, such as getting an associate degree, bachelor’s, master’s or a Ph.D. However, these days the bigger question seems to be the mode of instruction in which to get the degree. With both online and on-campus options now widely available to students across the country, this selection process becomes quite tricky. Let’s have a look at the pros and cons of each case.

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Which Nursing Specialty Is The Right Fit For You

  • 04-21-2017
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As the healthcare industry in the US expands, the demand for nurses is ever increasing. From emergency room and operating room nurses to orthopedic and pediatric nurses, these trained professionals are required to demonstrate their skills in a variety of different roles.

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Believe IT Or Not But Doing Nothing Can Help You Become A Better Teacher

  • 04-14-2017
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Using the phrases “doing nothing” and “getting better” in the same sentence sounds like a mistake. But for teachers, it might just be as good as a magic trick.

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Changing The Future of Higher Education One Online Degree At A Time

  • 04-14-2017
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For hundreds of years, students have gathered in specific places of education to learn new things and find direction in life. But changing times have brought about tremendous upgrades in the way knowledge passes on from teachers to students.

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Why You Cant Be Great At Sales Courtesy of The American Education System

  • 04-13-2017
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Our education system has never been one for fostering and encouraging curiosity. Instead, it is a system which is built upon rewarding knowing the ‘right’ answers. But where does this get us? For most people who go through an education system as rigid and results-based as our own, traits like curiosity and wonder are slowly and surely weeded out. These traits are essential if you want to be good in sales.

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Eat Healthy and Ace Your Exams

  • 04-13-2017
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Our education system is a results-based, knowledge driven enterprise. The success of the system is measured by how well students perform on tests and demonstrate their knowledge. Poor test results are an indicator that students aren’t absorbing the material well and that there is a problem that needs to be addressed. But is there something that influences how well students perform on standardized tests? The findings of a recent study point to the fact that healthier school lunches may have a direct effect on test scores and what students are able to achieve.

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2017 Is The Year of The Project Managers

  • 03-29-2017
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Project management is a field which is expected to experience tremendous growth this year. What’s interesting is the fact that as early as 2013, research was indicating that this profession would see a massive boom through until 2020. So far, the employment trends and job growth in this profession have confirmed the predictions made by so many.

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Are You Inspired By Abraham Lincoln to Be A Better Leader Here Are 4 Courses That Can Help

  • 03-29-2017
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Abraham Lincoln is remembered as one of America’s greatest presidents. Not only did he play an integral role in keeping the union intact during the Civil War; he also made substantial progress toward abolishing slavery in the United States. For anyone studying what goes into making a good leader, Abraham Lincoln provides a fantastic example of what characteristics to foster.

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How to Help A Student Experiencing Trauma The Dos and Donts

  • 03-23-2017
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Students spend a large chunk of their day-to-day lives in schools. Some of them are exposed to traumatic events in life, not only affecting their daily lives, but also academic progress.  According to the American Psychological Association (APA), the definition of trauma is as follows:

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Why Liberal Arts Degrees Are More Valuable Than You Might Think

  • 03-16-2017
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The short answer is: YES! This is a question that pretty much every liberal arts or humanities major faces at some point during their education.  A liberal arts degree has a lot of value – more than you might think at first.

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6 Secrets For Making Co Teaching Work in The Classroom

  • 03-16-2017
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A co-teaching team usually includes a general teacher paired with a special education teacher. The purpose of this is to promote a greater degree of inclusion and make general education accessible to all kinds of learners in a classroom. Both the educators on a co-teaching team are responsible for planning and delivering lectures, assessing students, determining performance improvement and managing the classroom. Effective co-teaching, however, takes a lot of time and effort to perfect.

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5 Simple Tips For Students to Save Time and Boost Energy

  • 03-09-2017
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Schools and colleges are places of high stress for students. In the process of getting ahead, scoring better and dealing with heightened competition, most students tend to lose track of where their basic resources, time and energy, are being spent. Time and energy utilized in the right way can not only help you at school and college, but it will also go a long way in developing you into a well-balanced human being.

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